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  • Writer's pictureEve Was Right

What if Satan is God's BFF?

Updated: Apr 8

Fear of the unseen gives away our power.


Our cultural concept of Satan is a true masterpiece, considering it has no textual basis in theology or mythology. The Torah serves as the foundational text for 57.6% of the world’s population, yet it never once mentioned Satan as we’ve come to define him. If we’re willing to entertain the possibility Satan is nothing like how our cultures see him, the next question necessarily becomes: Who is Satan, and how does he work? 


Christians use Satan as a wildly convenient catch-all to explain immoral behavior. Funnily enough, I’ve rarely heard Satan blamed when bad things happen that are outside of human control. This excuse mostly comes into play when humans act counter to moral expectations.


(Buddy Satan meme) Happy Satan with a thumbs-up. Above the image it says "Everyone blaming Satan for their actions" and Satan is saying "That's all you, buddy"

Admittedly, it’s quite comforting to think an amorphous entity, the very personification of evil, caused everything uncomfortable in the world. Especially when confronted with the alternative, which is that your neighbor is capable of doing some terrible things all on their own, and when multiplied by eight billion, we end up in the situation we’re in without much help on Satan’s part. 


Let’s assume everything our religions tell us about Satan is true. Even if we take everything at face value and go to the absolute worst-case scenario, the very maximum Satan is able to do is… Tempt people. 


Temptation?! Whatever will we do in the face of such power? 


Let’s assume everything our religions tell us about Satan is true. Even if we take everything at face value... the very maximum Satan is able to do is tempt people.

I used to know someone who cautioned me not to meditate because meditation might leave my mind open for Satan to enter. But honestly, so what? If we follow the train of thought, we realize the worst thing to happen would be encountering stickier-than-normal negative thoughts in our heads. For example, maybe someone cuts me off, and I find myself getting furious, and I think, “I’ll kill them!” 


Let’s be honest - we’ve all had those reactions. And then we stop and go, “Whoa. I’m cranky. Have some crackers.” Then we have some crackers, and everything goes back to normal. 


Although Satan offers a convenient scapegoat for bad actions, the concept creates a sharp double-edged sword; once you believe something outside of yourself can make you do something through some unseen power, you’ve given away all of your agency. 


Once you believe something outside of yourself can make you do something through some unseen power, you’ve given away all of your agency.

New Age circles preserved this idea but masked it in the concept of “bad energy.” People even place psychic protections upon themselves as they walk around the world to keep bad energy away. In doing so, you’re admitting something you have no control over can steal your power. It’s a self-fulfilling prophecy. 


I walk out of the house with an uncomfortable, unshakeable confidence that I must blame myself if I do something harmful, because I alone control my actions. 


Several years ago, I acquired a temporary, severe form of OCD from a bad medication reaction. OCD comes in a lot of flavors, but my particular brand featured obsessive, all-encompassing thoughts revolving around being a terrible person. Awful thoughts bombarded me constantly, and I was immobilized by the fear of them representing my true self.


I’m free from that period in my life. I got through it by attending a mindfulness-based therapy program, which trained me to accept those thoughts, recognize their presence, and let them pass like clouds in the sky. 


Our cultural concept of Satan sounds a lot like this kind of OCD. Satan throws all sorts of terrible thoughts and urges at you, and it’s your job to recognize they hold no power over you, own your actions, and let them pass. 


When I die, maybe Satan will come up to me and say, “Oh, hey you! Satan, it’s a pleasure to finally meet you; you might be familiar with me - my demons tortured you with temptations and horrible thoughts your whole life.” 


I wouldn’t be upset. I wouldn’t have grown if I hadn’t been tested. OCD forced me to learn how to accept my negative thoughts and release their hold on me.


Obviously, this is much harder if you ascribe to a belief system where thoughts can be inherently sinful. The only sinful thought is the one you consciously choose to pursue after you notice it. For example, there’s no way to avoid the passing thought, “Wow, my neighbor’s wife is beautiful.” However, if you follow it with 30 minutes of fantasizing about your neighbor’s wife, then you’ve got a problem. 


Culturally, Jews believe Satan functions as opposing counsel in God’s court. He quite literally plays Devil’s advocate - he voices the alternative viewpoint. He produces pressure to make diamonds. Who can blame him? Someone has to do it. 


Satan only has power if we give him power. Let’s laugh it off and start taking our power back.


Satan only has power if we give him power. Let’s laugh it off and start taking our power back. 

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